Item #1021 A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman. Paul Lawrence Dunbar.
A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman
A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman
A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman
A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman
A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman

A Southern Silhouette [and] Howdy, Honey, Howdy (a review of); in The Southern Workman

Hampton: Hampton Institute Press, 1899 and 1905. First Edition. Wrappers. 2 vols. Vol. XXVIII, No. 1, January 1899 and Vol. XXXIV, No. 11, November 1905. Both in their scarce original wrappers, with chipping to the extremities (the 1905 issue is more extensive) a light vertical fold crease to the 1899 issue, but both are complete and clean internally. Very good. Pre-1920 issues are scarce. OCLC list many institutions that have some scattered issues, but a complete run in holdings is improbable. Very good. Item #1021

In the 1899 issue is an uncollected (and otherwise unpublished) short story by Dunbar, "A Southern Silhouette" in which a formerly wealthy and powerful southern family fully supports the Confederate cause, looses everything then is saved by a northern businessman who returns them to their old financial status, but they're unable to gain back happiness and freedom. The 1905 issue includes a review of Dunbar's book of poetry "Howdy, Honey, Howdy". The 1899 issue In the 1899 issue are further contributions by Alice C. Fletcher (an American anthropologist) and George B. Grinnell (anthropologist and historian). In the 1905 issue are contributions by Francis La Flesche (the first professional Native American ethnologist), Harriet Quimby (first woman in the United States to receive a pilot's license), John W. Lemon (a Black community activist), William T.B. Williams (dean at Tuskegee Institute) and Monroe N. Work (a Black sociologist and founder of the research and records department at the Tuskegee Institute).

The Southern Workman began in 1872 as a monthly publication by the Hampton University as means for information, an outlet of creative expression and a kind of vanity piece for the university to display the greatness of their students and teachers. The informative essays centered contemporary Black and Native American interests, while also examining folklore and traditions as a means of preservation.

Price: $500.00

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