Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie. Edward Tyson.
Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie
Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie
Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie
Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie

Orang–Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris; or, The Anatomy of a Pygmie

London: Thomas Bennet and Daniel Brown, 1699. First Edition. Hardcover. 1st edition. Reference: Printing and the Mind of Man number 169 (see page 101). Tyson’s groundbreaking treatise, the very first significant study in post–renaissance comparative morphology, the forerunner of all the science that connected man to his earlier ancestors, and the underpinning for Huxley’s Man’s Place in Nature (1863) and Darwin’s Descent of Man (1871). It is in this book that Tyson established a new family of anthropoid apes standing between monkey and man, and though the results he deduced from his anatomical descriptions proved misguided, he was the first to recognize that man was a close relative of certain lower animals. Tyson did not foresee the theory of evolution but this work stimulated others to ponder the possibility over the next 160 years, and thus contributed meaningfully to its formulation. Full dark red morocco, signed in gilt on the front inner dentelle by Sangorski (typically plain binding, as was Sangorski’s custom on science books), title page foxed and with 3 former owner’s signatures, folding plates with short tears or chips to the inside corners where they are usually pulled on to open them, else a near fine copy, and it’s complete with the ad leaf at the end. Among the foundational books of science and a beautiful copy of it, a combination not often encountered. Near fine. Item #343

If we go back to the beginning, humans descended from a wormlike creature, but it shows more on some people.

Price: $18,500.00

Item Sold

See all items by