9 Items of Ads and Articles Detailing the First U. S. Personal Computers.
9 Items of Ads and Articles Detailing the First U. S. Personal Computers
9 Items of Ads and Articles Detailing the First U. S. Personal Computers
9 Items of Ads and Articles Detailing the First U. S. Personal Computers

9 Items of Ads and Articles Detailing the First U. S. Personal Computers

various: various, 1971-1976. Wrappers. 13 vols. All are the 1st appearances anywhere. All in original wrappers, near fine. Near fine. Item #430

1: Scientific American, Sep. 1971. Page 194, the first ad for the first personal computer (Kenbak–1).
2: QST, Mar. 1974. Page 154, the first ad for the first Mini–Computer (Scelbi–8H).
3: Radio–Electronics, Jul. 1974. Pages 29–33, Jonathan A. Titus: Build the Mark 8 Minicomputer (the first magazine project microcomputer).
4: Popular Electronics, Jan. 1975. Pages 33–38, Edward H. Roberts [and] William Yates: Altair 8800 Minicomputer (part 1).
5: Popular Electronics, Feb. 1975. Pages 56–58, Edward H. Roberts [and] William Yates: Altair 8800 Minicomputer (part 2).
6: Byte Magazine. First 5 issues, Sep. 1975–Jan. 1976. Loaded with goodies.
7: Computer Notes [Altair Users Group], Nov.–Dec. 1975. Page 19, Bill Gates: The Status of BASIC (the primitive interpreter, originally on paper tape, first revealed in Mar. 1975, a month before Gates and Allen founded Microsoft).
8: Computer Notes [Altair Users Group], Jan. 1976. Page 1, announcement of the first Altair Convention. Page 13, Bill Gates (article on programming). Page 14, Bill Gates (article on software). Issues of Computer Notes are all scarce.
9: Computer Notes [Altair Users Group], Feb. 1976. Faint stains. Page 3, Bill Gates: An Open Letter to Hobbyists (Feb. 3). A highly important statement outlining what became the Microsoft business model, and clarifying distinctions between proprietary vs. open–source software (Altair licensed Microsoft BASIC).

Footprints on the summit are soon blown away, but each of these items made their mark briefly for those who cared at the time, so remain worth revering. In Jul. 1975 the first computer store opened (in L. A.). In Mar. 1976 Albuquerque hosted the first World Altair Computer Conference (see no. 8) and by then, even novices knew something was happening. And I note that the word “something” as I’ve used it in the last sentence has no synonym.

Price: $2,500.00

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